(insert catchy clickbait title here)

“Listen to this, Job; stop and consider God’s wonders.
Do you know how God controls the clouds and makes his lightning flash?
Do you know how the clouds hang poised, those wonders of him who has perfect knowledge?”
Job 37:14-16

“Teach us to number our days, that we may gain a heart of wisdom.” Psalm 90:12

“Nothing is very strong: strong enough to steal away a man’s best years not in sweet sins but in a dreary flickering of the mind over it knows not what and knows not why, in the gratification of curiosities so feeble that the man is only half aware of them, in drumming of fingers and kicking of heels, in whistling tunes that he does not like, or in the long, dim labyrinth of reveries that have not even lust or ambition to give them a relish, but which, once chance association has started them, the creature is took weak and fuddled to shake off.” C.S. Lewis, The Screwtape Letters

iphone

Courtesy of unsplash.com and João Silas

Did you know that iPhones can be set to grayscale? Go to Settings, then General, and then Accessibility. I discovered this after watching a clickbait video while mindlessly scrolling through Facebook.

Facestachat stalking/scrolling isn’t exactly a riveting activity, but it’s so easy to get pulled in. There’s something about social media that grabs my attention. Do I really care about my cousin’s friend’s little brother’s girlfriend’s ironic puppy photo shoot? No! So why did I scroll through 20 photos and then read a listicle about 14 reasons to get a puppy instead of a baby?

People need relationships. Somehow, I’ve tried to satisfy my hunger for relationships with puppy photos and clickbait. And I wonder why it makes me feel like a waste of space. In her book The Gifts of Imperfection, Brené Brown states,

Our innate need for connection makes the consequences of disconnection that much more real and dangerous. Sometimes we only think we’re connected. Technology, for instance, has become a kind of imposter for connection, making us believe we’re connected when we’re really not—at least not in the ways we need to be. In our technology-crazed world, we’ve confused being communicative with feeling connected. Just because we’re plugged in, doesn’t mean we feel seen and heard. In fact, hyper-communication can mean we spend more time on Facebook than we do face-to-face with people we care about.(Page 20)

I am guilty of escaping into my phone when I’m stressed, uncomfortable, lonely, or bored. It’s an effective anesthetic. Social media also acts as a filter. I create the persona and life I want to share. This avoids the kind of messy relationships where you hurt the people closest to you by spewing out anger. It also removes us from learning the meaning of grace when those friends forgive you and love you through it.

I changed my phone to grayscale about a week ago. It’s a reminder that my real connections, my real life, and my real loves are in front of me. I don’t want to waste precious face-to-face time staring at a hunk of machinery. Smart phones are incredible tools and can help promote relationship building, but everything in that phone pales in comparison to the joy and beauty outside of it.

For further consideration:

Propaganda is my favorite. You won’t regret watching this.

Written by Rebecca Wineland

Rebecca Wineland

Becca spends her days changing diapers, playing “Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes” on the ukulele, and stubbornly pursuing her dream of starting a teen mentoring program. She’s a recent DC transplant with a love for laughter and a passion for prayer.

About Rebecca Wineland

Becca spends her days changing diapers, playing "Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes" on the ukulele, and stubbornly pursuing her dream of starting a teen mentoring program. She's a recent DC transplant with a love for laughter and a passion for prayer.

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